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Limitations of Current Treatment

The most common stroke reduction strategy for patients with Afib is the use of oral anticoagulants (OACs), which increase bleeding risk, require ongoing monitoring, and are not well accepted by patients.9

Currently available, first generation devices require exact sizing and precise delivery with patients under general anesthesia with continuous TEE (Trans Esophageal Echo ).

William A. Gray, MD

Interventional Cardiologist, System Chief, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Main Line Health, Philadelphia
Many of my patients cannot or will not sign up for lifelong oral anticoagulation. They are concerned about bleeding risks and do not want to take daily medications. We need an effective alternative to prevent strokes that patients will readily accept.

Andrew Torkelson, MD

General Cardiologist, New London, NH
Left Atrial Appendage closure, is currently reserved for AFib patients who cannot tolerate chronic anticoagulation. Establishing LAAC as a first line therapy will require an easy-to-size and friendly-to-deliver device allowing the procedure to be performed by a single physician on consciously sedated patients with local anesthesia.

Martin B. Leon, MD

Mallah Family Professor of Cardiology and Director, Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center

1st Generation Technology

Difficult to Deploy

Currently available, first generation devices require exact sizing and precise delivery with patients under general anesthesia with continuous TEE (Trans Esophageal Echo ).

William A. Gray, MD

Interventional Cardiologist, System Chief, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Main Line Health, Philadelphia

Oral Anticoagulants

My Patients Do Not Like Blood Thinners!

Many of my patients cannot or will not sign up for lifelong oral anticoagulation. They are concerned about bleeding risks and do not want to take daily medications. We need an effective alternative to prevent strokes that patients will readily accept.

Andrew Torkelson, MD

General Cardiologist, New London, NH

LAAC Current Indication

For Patients Who Cannot Take Chronic OAC

Left Atrial Appendage closure, is currently reserved for AFib patients who cannot tolerate chronic anticoagulation. Establishing LAAC as a first line therapy will require an easy-to-size and friendly-to-deliver device allowing the procedure to be performed by a single physician on consciously sedated patients with local anesthesia.

Martin B. Leon, MD

Mallah Family Professor of Cardiology and Director, Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center